Save Animals

Zero Happiness for Zebras in Circuses

If you’ve ever been to a circus that uses animals, you’ve probably seen zebras performing “tricks” for the crowd. But have you ever wondered what life is really like for these beautiful animals? It’s not pretty.

Just take Lima’s story, for example. After years of being dragged around the country and forced to perform for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, a 12-year-old zebra named Lima escaped from his trainers, squeezed through a fence, and ran through the busy streets of Atlanta for 40 minutes, while being chased by circus workers and police.

Police finally caught Lima, but his hooves were injured so badly that he had to be euthanized.

Zebra-In-Small-Cage 2

Zebras are wild animals, just like the lions, tigers, elephants, and others abused by circuses. Wild animals (and any animals!) should never be locked inside cages or forced to perform confusing tricks for screaming crowds, because it’s dangerous for both the animals and the public.

Fighting-Zebras

For example, three zebras, including Lima, escaped from Ringling while the circus was performing in Baltimore and dashed into traffic. And when Ringling was performing in Colorado Springs, Colorado, four zebras and three horses who were being walked into an arena got spooked and ran onto a road alongside a busy highway.

Zebras-in-The-Circus

In the wild, zebras roam large areas and can run up to 40 miles an hour. But when they’re used in circuses like Ringling Bros., they’re kept in cramped pens and denied everything that is natural and important to them.¬†Plus, prey animals like zebras are much more likely to get certain diseases when they’re extremely stressed out, as they are in circuses.

Zebras-In-Pen

Zebras are feeling, breathing animals. They form close bonds with their herd members, just like humans do with their families. When a group member is wounded, zebras will circle around the injured animal to protect him or her from predators. Pretty cool, huh?

Zebras-in-Wild

Zebras should be enjoying their lives in the wild, not caged and forced to travel across the country in circuses for human entertainment. Are you ready to help these amazing striped animals?